2017 M2 Machines Model-Kit 1967 Foose Cherry Nova

I’ve always thought these M2 Machines Model-Kits were pretty cool, but this is the first one I’ve added to my collection. I have three other versions of the Foose Cherry Nova (Foose R1, Foose R2 and Foose SCF06) and, as it says on the package, this kit is a unique variation. The kit comes with two sets of wheels and rims, a phillips head screwdriver and an M2 Machines diecast Auto-Lift.

2017 M2 Machines | Model-Kit R14 | 1967 Chevrolet “Foose Cherry Nova” | gloss black with red stripes | 1:64

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2017 Auto-Drivers R44 1958 Chevrolet Impala

M2 Machines Auto-Drivers release 44 continues their recent practice of partnering with well-know automotive aftermarket industry brands in the decoration of both the packaging and the model. This MSD 1958 Impala makes a nice companion to the Weiand 1967 Nova from R43 that I picked up awhile back.

M2 Machines | 2017 Auto-Drivers R44 | 1958 Chevrolet Impala | gloss black with bright red top, MSD graphics

MSD is headquartered in El Paso, Texas, where it has been designing, testing and assembling a range of ignition system products since 1970.

If you’d like to see more of my M2 ’58 Impalas, you can follow a link trail starting with this Auto-Vault version from 2017.

2017 M2 Machines Weiand 1967 Chevrolet Nova SS

The M2 Machines 2017 Auto-Drivers Release 43 includes a nice selection of models all decked-out in your favorite automotive performance brand liveries. It includes a Holley 1950 Studebaker 2R Truck and a 1970 Dodge Super Bee bearing the Hooker Headers logo, among others. I found my Weiand 1967 Chevy Nova SS at a Walmart.

2017 M2 Machines Auto-Drivers R43 | 1967 Chevrolet Nova SS | gloss black with yellow Weiand graphics | 1:64

The Weiand story began in the 1930s when Phil Weiand opened a performance parts warehouse, eventually producing his own product – the first aluminum intake manifold – in 1937. For eight decades, Weiand has produced a variety of manifolds, aluminum cylinder heads, water pumps and superchargers. The company was acquired in the late 1990s by Holley but still produces its own products under the Weiand name.

You can see a few more of my M2 Machines 1967 Chevy Novas here.

M2 Machines 2017 Auto-Vault 1958 Chevrolet Impala

I admit I don’t give it much effort, but I’ve never found a Hot Wheels Treasure Hunt or a chase car of any kind in a store. While we were vacationing in Minnesota in June, I picked up this new variation of the M2 Machines 1958 Chevrolet Impala at a WalMart. It wasn’t until I got home that I noticed the MEX03 code and realized it was not just a normal release. Could it be I finally found something rare? This is what the M2 Facebook page posted back in April:

Attention M2 Machines collectors – keep your eyes peeled for the first official M2 Machines Auto-Vault release making its way into Walmart stores throughout the US next month. Due to economic situations in Mexico 1600pcs of the 4000pcs of each casting produced for Walmart Mexico 31500-MEX03 and 31500-MEX04 were redirected to the United States for distribution. Wanting to change things up a bit for collectors we decided to repackage the vehicles to maintain a clear visual difference between the Mex and US releases. Though the vehicles are the same, we ditched the clamshell packaging and opted to put these 1600pcs of each casting in an all new Auto-Vault wrap. If you were not able to add these releases to your collection this is a great opportunity to pick them up.

I’m not actually sure how 1600 pieces compares to the production numbers for a Treasure Hunt, but I think M2’s chase cars are limited to 750, so this one is not quite on that level. But I really like the look of it either way.

2017 Auto-Vault MEX03 | 1958 Chevrolet Impala | black

Some of my other recent M2 Impalas can be seen here.

M2 Machines Auto-Drivers and Detroit Muscle 1967 Chevy Nova SS

I remember being impressed when, about a year ago, I first saw a preview on Facebook of this M2 Machines Special Edition Auto-Drivers release of the 1967 Chevrolet Nova SS. And I was not disappointed when I eventually found one in the store last fall. The “frozen black pearl” paint is really striking against the black interior, black wheels with redlines, and blacked-out grill and bumpers. Unfortunately, my photos don’t do it justice.

img_9203 img_92102016 Auto-Drivers R35 Special Edition | 1967 Chevrolet Nova SS 15-28 | frozen black pearl | 1:64

I also found the Detroit-Muscle R34 ’67 Nova in “emerald turquoise”, which also sports redlines.

img_9207img_92062016 Detroit Muscle R34 | 1967 Chevrolet Nova SS | emerald turquoise with black top | 1:64

I have many M2 Machines 1967 Novas. My favorites include the Target Exclusive version and the 60 Years of Turbo Fire release.

New Year’s Inventory

Someone asked me recently how many cars I had in my collection. The best guess I could come up with was “in the hundreds” but I wasn’t really sure. So I decided to spend part of New Year’s Day counting everything up. I keep updated lists, so it was mostly just a matter of counting and totaling the numbers. Or so I thought, until I realized how many items were not on my supposedly updated lists. After a few more days of inventorying, I came up with a total of 951 items.

I generally think of my collection as having three categories: Vintage, Novas and Impalas. But occasionally I can’t resist something that doesn’t really fit into any of these. I counted multi-car packs as single items and I did not include several buckets of cars that I have acquired over the years that I have deemed not worthy of my collection. These are the cars that my son and I use whenever we break out the Hot Wheels tracks.

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397 Vintage
In my collection, “vintage” is very loosely defined. These 395 items include my childhood collection and a bunch of almost entirely loose cars with a focus on blackwall-era Hot Wheels. The oldest items would be a few late-1950s Lesney-era Matchbox cars, and I cheat the “blackwall era” with a few cars into the early 1990s.

I have 45 cars that I’ve managed to hold onto from my childhood. They include 18 Matchbox, 9 Hot Wheels, 7 Tomica Pocket Cars, 6 Husky, 4 Playart and a single Majorette.

The remaining 350 Vintage cars break down as follows:

Hot Wheels – 219
Matchbox – 53
Corgi – 14
Zylmex – 11
Yatming – 9
Racing Champions – 8
Majorette – 7
Road Champs – 4
Ertl – 4
Tomica – 4
Siku – 2
Summer – 2
Barclay – 1
Husky – 1
Kidco – 1
Playart – 1
Pit Row – 1
Tin Toys – 1
Unknown – 9

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262 Impalas
When I first started picking up Impalas, I would take them out of the package and display them on a bookcase I had in my bachelor pad. Series like Jada’s Homie Rollerz and the Revell Lowrider Magazine cars encouraged me to start keeping them in the packages. Since Hot Wheels rolled out the ’59 Chevy Impala in 1997, there has been a steady stream of new Impala castings and variations, which puts the brand at the top of this list with 85 items.

Hot Wheels – 85
Johnny Lightning – 59
Revell – 22
Jada – 21
M2 Machines – 15
Greenlight – 14
Maisto – 11
Ertl – 6
Racing Champions – 6
Malibu International – 5
Motor Max – 4
Muscle Machines – 3
Auto World – 3
Disney – 3
Classic Metal Works – 1
Craft House – 1
Geospace – 1
Route 66 – 1
Unknown – 1

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188 Novas
The 2004 release of the Hot Wheels 1968 Nova was an exciting moment for me as a collector. Hot Wheels now has a variety of Nova castings going back to the first-generation body style, so the brand is at the top of my Nova list with 85 items.

Hot Wheels – 85
Johnny Lightning – 38
M2 Machines – 27
Maisto – 10
Muscle Machines – 9
Jada – 7
Ertl – 5
Racing Champions – 3
Playing Mantis – 2
GMP – 1
Universal Hobbies – 1

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104 Miscellaneous
The 90 items here include 10 Hot Wheels 30th Anniversary models from 1998, lots of Batmobiles, NASA-themed items including 3 Hot Wheels Action Packs, some 2005-2006 Hot Wheels Classics and a bunch of other odds and ends.

Hot Wheels – 78
Johnny Lightning – 5
Jada – 4
Matchbox – 4
Lledo – 2
Quartzo – 2
Revell – 2
Bauer – 1
Hormel Promo – 1
Maisto – 1
Upper Deck Collectibles – 1
Unknown – 2

My Collection by Brand
My collection is made up of at least 41 different brands. Being well-represented in all of my categories, the Hot Wheels brand dominates with 476 items. Johnny Lightning comes in second with 102, mostly due to the many Nova and Impala releases during the RC2 era. It’s interesting to note that Matchbox has never made a Nova and the only Impalas made in recent years are the eight-generation version which I have no interest in, yet the brand takes third place with 75 items in my vintage collection.

Hot Wheels – 476
Johnny Lightning – 102
Matchbox – 75
M2 Machines – 42
Jada – 31
Revell – 24
Maisto – 22
Quartzo – 2
Racing Champions – 18
Greenlight – 14
Corgi – 13
Tomica – 11
Zylmex – 11
Yatming – 9
Husky – 7
Majorette – 7
Ertl – 6
Malibu International – 5
Motor Max – 5
Playart – 5
Road Champs – 4
Disney – 3
Auto World – 3
Lledo – 2
Playing Mantis – 2
Siku – 2
Summer – 2
Barclay – 1
Bauer – 1
Classic Metal Works – 1
Craft House – 1
Geospace – 1
GMP – 1
Hormel Promo – 1
Kidco – 1
Pit Row – 1
Route 66 – 1
Tin Toys – 1
Upper Deck Collectibles – 1
Universal Hobbies – 1
Unknown – 12

2015 and 2016 M2 Machines 1958 Chevrolet Impalas

I’ve recently acquired three more variations of the M2 Machines 1958 Chevrolet Impala. First, the Auto-Thentics R37 from 2015.

img_9298img_92992015 Auto-Thentics R37 | 1958 Chevrolet Impala 283 | metallic green

Next is the Auto-Drivers R36 from 2016.

img_9202img_92112016 Auto-Drivers R36 | 1958 Chevrolet Impala | yellow

And finally, the Auto-Drivers R37, also from 2016. The chase car for R37 is this same Impala but with gold wheels.

img_9201img_92122016 Auto-Drivers R37 | 1958 Chevrolet Impala | metallic purple with black top

Some of my other M2 Impalas can be seen herehere, here and here.