Hot Wheels 1980 Dumpin’ A and Other Salvage Finds

My brother Joe is doing some salvage work these days, and when I saw him at my family reunion in June, he brought me a bag of cars he had found in a house he was tasked with cleaning out.

This Hot Wheels Dumpin’ A was coated with grime and had what appeared to be a chunk of modeling clay stuck in the back. I used a popsicle stick to remove most of the clay, then dissolved the rest with vegetable oil. After going over the rest of the car with a damp Q-tip, I had myself a pretty sharp car!

This Dumpin’ A from 1980, with its orange paint and yellow plastic dumper, is the opposite brother to the first casting from 1979, which is yellow with an orange dumper.

1980 Hot Wheels | Dumpin’ A | orange with yellow dumper, yellow, orange and red trim | HK | bw

After looking over the rest of the cars in the bunch, I realized none of them would clean up well. So I decided to photograph them just as is. I often wonder about the history of the cars I acquire. How many previous owners did they have? Were any of them ever a child’s favorite toy? I’ve lived a pretty good life and have a hard time imagining the circumstances that would cause a family to leave a home with belongings still in it. I suspect these cars have some interesting stories they could tell.

1991 Hot Wheels | ’57 T-Bird | red with green, blue and pink trim, gray plastic base | MY | bw

1991 Hot Wheels | Bronco 4-Wheeler | white with black stripes, missing camper shell (Ecolab Pest Control promo) | MY | bw

1994 Hot Wheels | Back Burner | red with grey plastic engine (McDonald’s giveaway) | plastic 5-spoke

1999 Hot Wheels | Trail Runner | lime green (McDonald’s giveaway) | 5SP

2002 Hot Wheels | 40 Somethin’ | yellow with white and black trim | MY | PR5

1965 Lesney/Matchbox | #68 Mercedes Coach | orange, missing top half

1965 Lesney/Matchbox | #69 Hatra Tractor Shovel | orange with yellow wheels, black tires, missing top and shovel

1983 Matchbox | #11 Ford IMSA Mustang | black with yellow and green flames

1983 Matchbox | #7 Volkswagen Ruff Rabbit 4×4 | yellow with black rabbits

Majorette #228/291 Depanneuse | orange with black, blue and silver trim, missing black plastic tow hooks | 1:62 | Made in France

1981 Ertl | Dukes of Hazard General Lee | orange with blue and white trim, missing back wheel

Tootsietoy | La France Fire Truck | red | Chicago, USA

Tootsietoy | Crane | green, missing plastic crane cab and boom

Unknown | S8003 | Race Car | red with black, orange and white trim, plastic base

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New Year’s Inventory

Someone asked me recently how many cars I had in my collection. The best guess I could come up with was “in the hundreds” but I wasn’t really sure. So I decided to spend part of New Year’s Day counting everything up. I keep updated lists, so it was mostly just a matter of counting and totaling the numbers. Or so I thought, until I realized how many items were not on my supposedly updated lists. After a few more days of inventorying, I came up with a total of 951 items.

I generally think of my collection as having three categories: Vintage, Novas and Impalas. But occasionally I can’t resist something that doesn’t really fit into any of these. I counted multi-car packs as single items and I did not include several buckets of cars that I have acquired over the years that I have deemed not worthy of my collection. These are the cars that my son and I use whenever we break out the Hot Wheels tracks.

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397 Vintage
In my collection, “vintage” is very loosely defined. These 395 items include my childhood collection and a bunch of almost entirely loose cars with a focus on blackwall-era Hot Wheels. The oldest items would be a few late-1950s Lesney-era Matchbox cars, and I cheat the “blackwall era” with a few cars into the early 1990s.

I have 45 cars that I’ve managed to hold onto from my childhood. They include 18 Matchbox, 9 Hot Wheels, 7 Tomica Pocket Cars, 6 Husky, 4 Playart and a single Majorette.

The remaining 350 Vintage cars break down as follows:

Hot Wheels – 219
Matchbox – 53
Corgi – 14
Zylmex – 11
Yatming – 9
Racing Champions – 8
Majorette – 7
Road Champs – 4
Ertl – 4
Tomica – 4
Siku – 2
Summer – 2
Barclay – 1
Husky – 1
Kidco – 1
Playart – 1
Pit Row – 1
Tin Toys – 1
Unknown – 9

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262 Impalas
When I first started picking up Impalas, I would take them out of the package and display them on a bookcase I had in my bachelor pad. Series like Jada’s Homie Rollerz and the Revell Lowrider Magazine cars encouraged me to start keeping them in the packages. Since Hot Wheels rolled out the ’59 Chevy Impala in 1997, there has been a steady stream of new Impala castings and variations, which puts the brand at the top of this list with 85 items.

Hot Wheels – 85
Johnny Lightning – 59
Revell – 22
Jada – 21
M2 Machines – 15
Greenlight – 14
Maisto – 11
Ertl – 6
Racing Champions – 6
Malibu International – 5
Motor Max – 4
Muscle Machines – 3
Auto World – 3
Disney – 3
Classic Metal Works – 1
Craft House – 1
Geospace – 1
Route 66 – 1
Unknown – 1

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188 Novas
The 2004 release of the Hot Wheels 1968 Nova was an exciting moment for me as a collector. Hot Wheels now has a variety of Nova castings going back to the first-generation body style, so the brand is at the top of my Nova list with 85 items.

Hot Wheels – 85
Johnny Lightning – 38
M2 Machines – 27
Maisto – 10
Muscle Machines – 9
Jada – 7
Ertl – 5
Racing Champions – 3
Playing Mantis – 2
GMP – 1
Universal Hobbies – 1

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104 Miscellaneous
The 90 items here include 10 Hot Wheels 30th Anniversary models from 1998, lots of Batmobiles, NASA-themed items including 3 Hot Wheels Action Packs, some 2005-2006 Hot Wheels Classics and a bunch of other odds and ends.

Hot Wheels – 78
Johnny Lightning – 5
Jada – 4
Matchbox – 4
Lledo – 2
Quartzo – 2
Revell – 2
Bauer – 1
Hormel Promo – 1
Maisto – 1
Upper Deck Collectibles – 1
Unknown – 2

My Collection by Brand
My collection is made up of at least 41 different brands. Being well-represented in all of my categories, the Hot Wheels brand dominates with 476 items. Johnny Lightning comes in second with 102, mostly due to the many Nova and Impala releases during the RC2 era. It’s interesting to note that Matchbox has never made a Nova and the only Impalas made in recent years are the eight-generation version which I have no interest in, yet the brand takes third place with 75 items in my vintage collection.

Hot Wheels – 476
Johnny Lightning – 102
Matchbox – 75
M2 Machines – 42
Jada – 31
Revell – 24
Maisto – 22
Quartzo – 2
Racing Champions – 18
Greenlight – 14
Corgi – 13
Tomica – 11
Zylmex – 11
Yatming – 9
Husky – 7
Majorette – 7
Ertl – 6
Malibu International – 5
Motor Max – 5
Playart – 5
Road Champs – 4
Disney – 3
Auto World – 3
Lledo – 2
Playing Mantis – 2
Siku – 2
Summer – 2
Barclay – 1
Bauer – 1
Classic Metal Works – 1
Craft House – 1
Geospace – 1
GMP – 1
Hormel Promo – 1
Kidco – 1
Pit Row – 1
Route 66 – 1
Tin Toys – 1
Upper Deck Collectibles – 1
Universal Hobbies – 1
Unknown – 12

Ertl Diecast

When I think of Ertl Diecast, I think of farm equipment, which is what the company was making way back when I first became aware of them. During the 2000s, I picked up several of their nicely detailed Novas and Impalas for my collection. The company was owned by RC2 for awhile, and now are a part of TOMY. They seem to have gone back to their farm equipment focus, as their current website proclaims “The Definitive Leader in American Farm Replicas since 1945” and has menus for John Deere, Case/IH and New Holland toys.

There were no farm tractors among the few 1:64(ish) Ertl toys in the box I got from RR. In fact, I was a little surprised to find a nice Rolls Royce model included with the expected American cars.

IMG_8169 IMG_8170Replica Series | Pontiac Firebird | black | plastic base | made in Hong Kong

IMG_8166 IMG_8167 IMG_8168Replica Series | ’50 Ford | red with tan top | plastic base | made in Hong Kong

IMG_8171 IMG_8172Turbo Firebird | black | plastic base | made in China

IMG_8163IMG_8164IMG_8165European Classics | Rolls Royce Silver Shadow | blue | metal base | made in Hong Kong

hobbyDB

For several years, the South Texas Diecast website was my go-to for information on Hot Wheels. The site was home to the most complete online listing of Hot Wheels variations -compiled over 16 years by Diecast Hall of Famer, Robert Graves, Jr. – from the first redlines to the latest releases. In November of 2015, partly to ensure his database would live on, Graves decided to merge the STDC site into hobbyDB.

hobbyDB is more than diecast. The wiki-like site catalogs over 152,000 collectible items in over 30,000 subjects and claims nearly 10,000 users. With detailed descriptions of each item, not only is it a great source of information for the collector, users can also take advantage of the system to keep track of their own collections, create a wishlist, or buy and sell items as well.

Access to this amazing database is “free forever”, but hobbyDB relies on thousands of collectors to help keep the listings up-to-date and accurate. If you are a collector and you are interested in helping out, click this link for more information on becoming a hobbyDB curator.

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Batmobiles

This one is for my friend and fellow-blogger, Joel, who has a nice collection of Batmobiles too.

My favorite Batmobile is the one from 1966, and I’ve had a Playart version of it since I was a kid. I was pretty excited when Hot Wheels released their version as a New Model in 2007.

img_3334img_3340K6147 | 2007 New Models 1966 TV Series Batmobile 15/36 | black w Batman logo| 5SP

There now about 11 variations of this casting, and the only other one I have is this Faster Than Ever release from 2009.

img_3333img_3341P2453 |  2009 Faster Than Ever 1966 Batmobile 7/10 | black w Batman logo | FTE

For me, another important Batmobile is the one created for the 1989 Tim Burton Batman movie. This first came out as a Hot Wheels First Editions model in 2004. There are about 8 variations, including this HW Imagination release from 2013.

img_3332img_3339X1709 | 2013 HW Imagination 61/250 | Batmobile | black | gray PR5

Hot Wheels now has about 10 different Batmobiles inspired by many of the different movie and cartoon creations over the years, and there are multiple variations of each. This doesn’t include the Batcopters, Batcycles and Batpods, not to mention Batmobiles produced by other brands. So, if someone wanted to get serious about collecting Batmobiles, (I admit, it is tempting) they could keep at if for a long time!

I’ll leave you with another 1989 Batmobile from my collection, this one made by Ertl Diecast.  I’ve had this one long enough that I don’t remember much about it, but I’m pretty sure I picked it up about the same time that the movie first came out.

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